A Little Bit More Lockdown Art

This is Part Two of my jaunt through the Royal Academy, bringing you some beautiful art and its relation to the general lockdown experience.

When England went Bananas

On 10th April 1633, the earliest recorded bananas went on sale in England, in an apothecary on Snow Hill in London.
I’ve read more about bananas in the last 24 hours than I have in my entire life, but it was completely worth it – a bit of creative writing, a bit of fascinating history!

Harrington and Hogarth: (Street) Art in London

Comparing the 18th and 21st centuries, William Hogarth and Conor Harrington, the collision of the galleries and the streets of London.

A Very London Christmas

London has some wacky Yuletide traditions, a few of which I’ll share with you today. So sit back with your glass of mulled wine, put on a Father Christmas hat and some reindeer slippers, and enjoy… (and press play on the Christmas Hits playlist. You know you want to.)

Foundling

Two mothers and two Foundlings. Two strands of a story woven together in eighteenth century London.

Fanakapan and Claesz: (Street) Art in London

Another comparison between two seemingly polar opposite worlds! Fanakapan and his hyper realistic balloons to be compared to… *drum roll please*…
Pieter Claesz!
No, don’t know him? Well, all that’s about to change. He was part of the still life wave which took off in the Dutch Republic in the seventeenth century.

Old, New, and Wonderful: Cannon Street

I want to start a new little segment. The Old, the New, and the Wonderful. There’s so much to do in London and you’d need a lifetime to do it all, so to help out all of my fellow Adventurers, I’ll be putting together three things at a time: one old, one new, and one a little bit unusual. Today we’re looking at the area in and around Cannon Street in the City of London.

ROA and Stubbs: (Street) Art in London

London has an incredible collection of art galleries, and more recently, street art has been moving our galleries outdoors. Street art and “High” art seem like two completely different worlds, but not as much separates them as we think.